Professional Writing

  1. Albertine, Susan. A Living of Words: American Women in Print Culture. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1995.
  2. Chang, Leah L. Into Print: The Production of Female Authorship in Early Modern France. Newark: University of Delaware Press, 2009.
  3. Chapman, Alison. “Achieving Fame and Canonicity.” In The Cambridge Companion to Victorian Women’s Writing, edited by Linda H. Peterson, 73–86. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015.
  4. Coultrap-McQuin, Susan. Doing Literary Business: American Women Writers in the Nineteenth Century. Chapel Hill, N.C.: University of North Carolina Press, 1990.
  5. Davin, Eric Leif. Women and the Birth of Science Fiction, 1926-1965. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2006.
  6. Easley, Alexis. “Making a Debut.” In The Cambridge Companion to Victorian Women’s Writing, edited by Linda H. Peterson, 29–42. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015.
  7. Eddy, Jacalyn. Bookwomen: Creating an Empire in Children’s Book Publishing, 1919-1939. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2006.
  8. Ellis, Marman. “‘An Author in Form’: Women Writers, Print Publication, and Elizabeth Montagu’s Dialogues of the Dead.” ELH 79, no. 2 (2012): 417–55.
  9. Ezell, Margaret J. M. Social Authorship and the Advent of Print. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003.
  10. Gallagher, Catherine. Nobody’s Story: The Vanishing Acts of Women Writers in the Marketplace, 1670-1820. Berkeley, Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1995.
  11. Goldsmith, Elizabeth C. Going Public: Women and Publishing in Early Modern France. Ithaca, London: Cornell University Press, 1995.
  12. Gray, Floyd. Gender, Rhetoric, and Print Culture in French Renaissance Writing. Cambridge Studies in French 63. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.
  13. Grundy, Isobel. “Women and Print: Readers, Writers, and the Market.” In The Cambridge History of the Book in Britain, Volume 5: 1695–1830, edited by Michael F. Suarez and Michael L. Turner, 5:146–59. The Cambridge History of the Book in Britain. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2014.
  14. Grundy, Isobel, and Susan Wiseman, eds. Women, Writing, History, 1640-1740. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1992.
  15. Hammond, Brean S. Professional Imaginative Writing in England, 1670-1740: Hackney for Bread. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1997.
  16. Ingrassia, Catherine. Authorship, Commerce, and Gender in Early Eighteenth-Century England: A Culture of Paper Credit. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005.
  17. Kelly, Mary. Private Women, Public Stage: Literary Domesticity in Nineteenth-Century America. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1984.
  18. MacCarthy, B.G. The Female Pen: Women Writers and Novelists 1621-1818. New York: New York University Press, 1994.
  19. McDowell, Paula. The Women of Grub Street: Press, Politics, and Gender in the London Literary Marketplace, 1678-1730. Oxford, New York: Clarendon Press, 1998.
  20. Palmer, Beth. “Assuming the Role of Editor.” In The Cambridge Companion to Victorian Women’s Writing, edited by Linda H. Peterson, 59–72. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015.
  21. Peterson, Linda H. “Victorian Women’s Writing and Modern Literary Criticism.” In The Cambridge Companion to Victorian Women’s Writing, edited by Linda H. Peterson, 1–11. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015.
  22. ———. “Working with Publishers.” In The Cambridge Companion to Victorian Women’s Writing, edited by Linda H. Peterson, 43–58. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015.
  23. Robinson, Solveig C., ed. A Serious Occupation: Literary Criticism by Victorian Women Writers. Peterborough, Ontario: Broadview, 2003.
  24. Schellenberg, Betty. “The Professional Female Writer.” In The Cambridge Companion to Women’s Writing in Britain, 1660-1789, edited by Catherine Ingrassia, 37–54. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015.
  25. ———. The Professionalization of Women Writers in Eighteenth-Century Britain. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005.
  26. Shattock, Joanne. “Becoming a Professional Writer.” In The Cambridge Companion to Victorian Women’s Writing, edited by Linda H. Peterson, 29–42. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015.
  27. Spencer, Jane, and Jane Barker. “Creating the Woman Writer: The Autobiographical Works of Jane Barker.” Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature 2, no. 2 (1983): 165–81.
  28. Stanton, Judith Phillips. “Charlotte Smith’s ‘Literary Business’: Income, Patronage, and Indigence.” The Age of Johnson 1 (1987): 375–401.
  29. Tebeaux, Elizabeth. “The Emergence of Women Technical Writers in the 17th Century: Changing Voices Within a Changing Milieu.” In Three Keys to the Past: The History of Technical Communication, edited by Teresa Kynell-Hunt and Michael G. Moran, 105–21. Stamford, CN: Ablex Publishing Corp., 1999.
  30. Towsey, Mark. “Women as Readers and Writers.” In The Cambridge Companion to Women’s Writing in Britain, 1660-1789, edited by Catherine Ingrassia, 21–36. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015.
  31. Turner, Cheryl. Living by the Pen: Women Writers in the Eighteenth Century. London: Routledge, 1994.
  32. Uphaus, Robert W., and Gretchen M. Foster, eds. The “Other” Eighteenth Century: English Women of Letters 1660-1800. East Lansing, MI: Colleagues Press, 1991.
  33. Wilkes, Joanne. Women Reviewing Women in Nineteenth-Century Britain: The Critical Reception of Jane Austen, Charlotte Brontë and George Eliot. Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate, 2010.