Alphabetical by Author's Last Name

  1. 3M Corporate Art Program. Women in Print: Prints from 3M by Contemporary Women Printmakers: An Exhibition Held at the Concourse Gallery, 3M Center, St. Paul, Minnesota, July 7-August 24, 1995, and Circulated to Various Colleges, Museums, and Art Centers. St. Paul, MN: 3M Corporate Art Program, 1995.
  2. Absillis, Kevin. Vechten Tegen de Bierkaai. Over Het Uitgevershuis van Angèle Manteau [Fighting a Losing Battle. The Publishing House of Angèle Manteau]. Antwerp: Meulenhoff/Manteau, 2009.
  3. Adams, Kate. “Built Out of Books: Lesbian Energy and Feminist Ideology in Alternative Publishing.” Journal of Homosexuality 34, no. 3–4 (1998): 113–41.
  4. Adams, Kathryn Tracy. “Paper Lesbians: Alternative Publishing and the Politics of Lesbian Representation in the United States, 1950-1990.” PhD Dissertation, University of Texas at Austin, 1994.
  5. Adams, Kimberly van Esveld. “Women and Literary Criticism.” In The Cambridge History of Literary Criticism: The Nineteenth Century, edited by M. A. R. Habib, 6:72–94. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013.
  6. Adcock, Rachel. “‘Gather up the Fragments, That Nothing Be Lost’: ‘Memorable’ Women’s Conversion Narratives.” Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal 6 (2011): 209–15.
  7. Adelaide, Jane. A Bright and Fiery Troop: Australian Women Writers of the Nineteenth Century. Ringwood, Vic.: Penguin, 1988.
  8. Albertine, Susan. A Living of Words: American Women in Print Culture. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1995.
  9. Alexander, David. Caroline Watson & Female Printmaking in Late Georgian England. Cambridge: Fitzwilliam Museum, 2014.
  10. Alkan, Alphonse. Les Femmes Compositrices d’Imprimerie Sous La Revolution Française En 1794. Paris: Dentu, 1862.
  11. Allen, Martha Leslie. “The Development of Communication Networks among Women,  1963-1983: A History of Women’s Media.” PhD Dissertation, Howard University, 1988.
  12. Allen, Susan M. “Jane Yetsweirt (1541–?): Claiming Her Place.” Print History (Old Series) 9, no. 2 (1987): 5–12.
  13. Arbour, Roméo. Dictionnaire Des Femmes Libraires En France, 1470-1870. Genève: Droz, 2003.
  14. Ardis, Ann. New Women, New Novels: Feminism and Early Modernism. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1990.
  15. Armstrong, Isobel, and Virginia Blain, eds. Women’s Poetry, Late Romantic to Late Victorian: Gender and Genre, 1830-1900. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1999.
  16. Arnold, June. “Feminist Presses and Feminist Politics.” Quest: A Feminist Quarterly 3, no. 1 (Summer 1976): 18–26.
  17. Ashbrook, Susan. “Two Portraits of Cape Cod: Amelia Watson and Clare Leighton.” Printing History (New Series) 8 (2010): 3–11.
  18. Atkinson, Juliette. “‘Quiet and Uneventful’?: Female Literary Biography.” In Victorian Biography Reconsidered: A Study of Nineteenth-Century “Hidden” Lives, edited by Juliette Atkinson, 146–82. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010.
  19. Babcock, Robery Gary. A Book of Her Own: An Exhibition of Manuscripts and Printed Books in the Yale University Library That Were Owned by Women Before 1700. New Haven, Conn.: Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Yale University, 2005.
  20. Backscheider, Paula. Revising Women: Eighteenth-Century “Women’s Fiction” and Social Engagement. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000.
  21. Bacon-Smith, Camille. Enterprising Women: Television Fandom and the Creation of Popular Myth. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1992.
  22. Badia, Janet, and Jennifer Phegley, eds. Reading Women: Literary Figures and Cultural Icons from the Victorian Age to the Present. Toronto; Buffalo: University of Toronto Press, 2005.
  23. Bailey, Courtney. “Bitching and Talking/Gazing Back; Feminism as Critical Reading.” Women & Language 26, no. 2 (2003): 1–8.
  24. Baker, Niamh. Happily Ever After?: Women’s Fiction in Postwar Britain, 1945-60. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1989.
  25. Ballaster, Ros. Seductive Forms: Women’s Amatory Fiction from 1684 to 1740. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1992.
  26. Barker, Hannah. “Women, Work and the Industrial Revolution: Female Involvement in the English Printing Trades, C. 1700-1840.” In Gender in Eighteenth-Century England: Roles, Representations and Responsibilities, edited by Hannah Barker and Eliane Chalus, 81–100. London, NY: Longman, 1997.
  27. Barlett, Anne Clark. Male Authors, Female Readers: Representation and Subjectivity in Middle English Devotional Literature. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1995.
  28. Barlow, Marjorie. Notes on Women Printers in Colonial America and the United States, 1639-1975. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1976.
  29. Baron, Ava. “Woman’s ‘Place’ in Capitalist Production: A Study of Class Relations in the Nineteenth Century Newspaper Printing Industry.” PhD Dissertation, New York University, 1981.
  30. Barrett, T.H. The Woman Who Discovered Printing. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2008.
  31. Bassnet, Susan. “Travel Writing and Gender.” In The Cambridge Companion to Travel Writing, edited by Peter Hulme and Tim Youngs, 225–41. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002.
  32. Batsleer, Janet, Tony Davies, Rebecca O’Rourke, and Chris Weedon, eds. Rewriting English: Cultural Politics of Gender and Class. London; New York: Methuen, 1985.
  33. Beach, Alison I. Women as Scribes: Book Production and Monastic Reform in Twelfth-Century Bavaria. Cambridge Studies in Palaeography and Codicology 10. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004.
  34. Beech, Beatrice. “Charlotte Guillard: A Sixteenth-Century Business Woman.” Renaissance Quarterly 36, no. 3 (Autumn 1983): 345–67.
  35. ———. “Women Printers in Paris in the Sixteenth Century.” Medieval Prosopography 10, no. 1 (1989): 75–93.
  36. ———. “Yolande Bonhomme: A Renaissance Printer.” Medieval Prosopography 6, no. 2 (1985): 79–100.
  37. Beetham, Margaret. A Magazine of Her Own? Domesticity and Desire in the Woman’s Magazine, 1800-1914. London: Routledge, 1996.
  38. ———. “Periodical Writing.” In The Cambridge Companion to Victorian Women’s Writing, edited by Linda H. Peterson, 221–35. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015.
  39. Beetham, Margaret, and Kay Boardman, eds. Victorian Women’s Magazines: An Anthology. Manchester; New York: Manchester University Press ; Distributed exclusively in the USA by Palgrave, 2001.
  40. Beins, Agatha. “A Revolution in Ephemera: Feminist Newsletters and Newspapers of the 1970s.” In This Book Is an Action: Feminist Print Culture and Activist Aesthetics, edited by Jaine Harker and Cecilia Konchar Farr, 46–65. Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2016.
  41. ———. “Free Our Sisters, Free Ourselves: Locating U.S. Feminism through Feminist Periodicals, 1970-1983.” PhD Dissertation, Rutgers University, 2012.
  42. ———. “Sisterly Solidarity: Politics and Rhetoric of the Direct Address in US Feminism in the 1970s.” Women: A Cultural Review 21, no. 3 (2010): 292–308.
  43. Bell, Maureen. “A Dictionary of Women in the London Book Trade 1540-1730.” MLS Thesis, Loughborough University of Technology, 1983.
  44. ———. “Elizabeth Calvert and the ‘Confederates.’” Publishing History 32 (1992): 5–49.
  45. ———. “Hannah Allen and the Development of a Puritan Publishing Business, 1646-51.” Publishing History 26 (1989): 5–66.
  46. ———. “Her Usual Practices: The Later Career of Elizabeth Calvert, 1664-75.” Publishing History 35 (1994): 5–64.
  47. ———. “Mary Westwood: Quaker Publisher.” Publishing History 23 (1988): 5–66.
  48. ———. “Seditious Sisterhood: Women Publishers of Oppositional Literature at the Restoration.” In Voicing Women: Gender and Sexuality in Early Modern Writing, edited by Kate Chedgzoy, Melanie Hanson, and Suzanne Trill, 185–95. Pittsburgh: Duquesne University Press, 1997.
  49. ———. “Women and the Production of Texts: The Impact of the History of the Book.” In The Book Trade in Early Modern England: Practices, Perceptions, Connections, edited by John Hinks and Victoria Gardiner, 107–31. London: The British Library Publishing Division, 2014.
  50. ———. “Women in the English Book Trade 1557-1700.” Leipziger Jahrbuch Zur Buchgeschichte 6 (1996): 13–45.
  51. ———. “Women Publishers of Puritan Literature in the Mid-Seventeenth Century: Three Case Studies.” PhD Dissertation, Loughborough University of Technology, 1987.
  52. ———. “Women Writing, Women Written.” In A History of the Book in Britain Vol. IV, edited by J. Barnard, D.F. McKenzie, and Maureen Bell, 431–51. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002.
  53. Bell, Susan Groag, and Marilyn Yalom, eds. Revealing Lives: Autobiography, Biography, and Gender. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1990.
  54. Bellas, Patricia H. Women Printers in Early Maryland. Baltimore: Xavier Press, 1991.
  55. Bengali Academy. What Women Read in East Pakistan, A Survey Conducted by Bengali Academy for UNESCO. Karachi: National Book Center of Pakistan, 1964.
  56. Bennett, Betty. “Feminism and Editing Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley: The Editor And?/Or? The Text.” In Editorial Theory in the Humanities, edited by George Bornstein and Ralph G. Williams, 67–96. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1993. http://knarf.english.upenn.edu/Articles/bennett.html.
  57. Benstock, Shari, ed. The Private Self: Theory and Practice of Women’s Autobiographical Writings. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1988.
  58. Berenguier, Nadine. Conduct Books for Girls in Enlightenment France. Farnham, Surrey; Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2011.
  59. Bernstein, Susan David. Roomscape: Women Writers in the British Museum from George Eliot to Virginia Woolf. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2013.
  60. Berry, Helen. Gender, Society and Print Culture in Late-Stuart England: The Cultural World of the Athenian Mercury. Women and Gender in the Early Modern World. Aldershot, Hampshire: Ashgate, 2003.
  61. Betz, Phyllis M. Lesbian Detective Fiction: Woman as Author, Subject, and Reader. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Co., 2006.
  62. Biggs, Mary. “Neither Printer’s Wife nor Widow: American Women in Typesetting, 1830-1950.” The Library Quarterly: Information, Community, Policy 50, no. 4 (October 1980): 431–52.
  63. Blackwell, Maylei. “Contested Histories: Las Hijas De Cuauhtemoc, Chicana Feminisms, and Print Culture in the Chicano Movement, 1968-1973.” In Chicana Feminisms: A Critical Reader, edited by Gabriela F. Arredondo, Aida Hurtado, Norma Klahn, and Patricia Zavella. Durham: Duke University Press, 2003.
  64. ———. “Engendering Print Cultures and Chicana Feminist Counterpublics in the Chicano Movement.” In Chicana Power! Contested Histories of Feminism in the Chicano Movement, 133–59. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2011.
  65. Blanchard, Margaret. “Speaking the Plural: The Example of ‘Women’: A Journal of Liberation.” NWSA Journal 4, no. 1 (1992): 84–97.
  66. Bloom, Abigail Burnham, ed. Personal Moments in the Lives of Victorian Women: Selections from Their Autobiographies. 2 vols. Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellon Press, 2008.
  67. Bloom, Harold, ed. Women Writers of Children’s Literature. Philadelphia: Chelsea House, 1998.
  68. Blumenthal, Joseph. “Colonial Women.” In The Printed Book in America, 12–15. Hanover, NH: Published for Dartmouth College by University Press of New England, 1989.
  69. Bogardus, Janet. Some Bibliographical Notes about Women in Printing. New York: Parkway, 1937.
  70. Bollmann, Stefan. Women Who Read Are Dangerous. New York: Abbeville Press, 2016.
  71. Bookmaking on the Distaff Side. This Book Is the Product of the Writing, Designing, Typesetting and Printing of Women Printers. New York: Distaff Side, 1937.
  72. Boos, Florence. Working-Class Women Poets in Victorian Britain: An Anthology. Peterborough: Broadview Press, 2008.
  73. Bornstein, Diane. The Lady in the Tower: Medieval Courtesy Literature for Women. Hamden, CN: Archon Books, 1983.
  74. Brake, Laurel. Subjugated Knowledges: Journalism, Gender and Literature in the Nineteenth Century. Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1994.
  75. Brant, Clare, and Diane Purkiss. Women, Texts, and Histories: 1575-1760. London, NY: Routledge, 1992.
  76. Bratton, Jacky. The Making of the West End Stage: Marriage, Management and the Mapping of Gender in London, 1830-1870. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011.
  77. Bray, Joe. The Female Reader in the English Novel: From Burney to Austen. New York: Routledge, 2009.
  78. Brayman-Hackel, Heidi. Reading Material in Early Modern England Print, Gender, and Literacy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009.
  79. Brayman-Hackel, Heidi, and Catherine E. Kelly, eds. Reading Women: Literacy, Authorship, and Culture in the Atlantic World, 1500-1800. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008.
  80. Brodski, Bella, and Celeste Schenk, eds. Life/Lines: Theorizing Women’s Autobiography. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1988.
  81. Brodsky, Judith K. “Some Notes on Women Printmakers.” Art Journal 35, no. 4 (1975): 374–77.
  82. Broomhall, Susan. Women and the Book Trade in Sixteenth-Century France. Aldershot, Hampshire: Ashgate, 2002.
  83. Brophy, Elizabeth Bergen. Women’s Lives and the 18th-Century English Novel. Tampa: University of South Florida Press, 1991.
  84. Brown, Cynthia J. The Queen’s Library: Image-Making at the Court of Anne of Brittany, 1477-1514. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011.
  85. Brown, Susan. “The Victorian Poetess.” In The Cambridge Companion to Victorian Poetry, edited by Joseph Bristow, 180–202. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.
  86. Brownley, Martine Watson. “Samuel Johnson and the Printing Career of Hester Lynch Piozzi.” Bulletin of the John Rylands University Library of Manchester 67, no. 2 (Spring 1985): 623–40.
  87. Brownstein, Rachel M. Becoming a Heroine: Reading About Women in Novels. New York: Viking Press, 1982.
  88. Brożyna, Andrea Ebel. Labour, Love, and Prayer: Female Piety in Ulster Religious Literature, 1850-1914. Belfast; Montreal: Institute of Irish Studies, Queen’s University of Belfast; McGill-Queen’s University Press, 1999.
  89. Bunch, Charlotte. “Building Feminist Theory: The Story of Quest.” In Passionate Politics: Feminist Theory in Action, 1968-1986, 230–39. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1987.
  90. ———. “Reading and Writing for a Feminist Future.” In Passionate Politics: Feminist Theory in Action, 1968-1986, 217–21. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1987.
  91. ———. “Women’s Publishing: An Interview by Frances Doughty.” In Passionate Politics: Feminist Theory in Action, 1968-1986, 222–29. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1987.
  92. Burke, Victoria E. “Manuscript Miscellanies.” In The Cambridge Companion to Early Modern Women’s Writing, edited by Laura Lunger Knoppers, 55–67. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009.
  93. ———. “Seventeenth-Century Women’s Manuscript Writing.” In The History of British Women’s Writing, 1610-1690, edited by Mihoko Suzuki, 3:99–113. The History of British Women’s Writing. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
  94. ———. “Women and Early Seventeenth-Century Manuscript Culture: Four Miscellanies.” The Seventeenth Century 12 (1997): 135–50.
  95. Burke, Victoria E., and Jonathan Gibson, eds. Early Modern Women’s Manuscript Writing: Selected Papers from the Trinity/Trent Colloquium. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2004.
  96. Burr, Christina Ann. “Class and Gender in the Toronto Printing Trades, 1870-1914.” PhD Dissertation, Memorial University of Newfoundland, 1992.
  97. Burroughs, Catherine. Closet Stages: Joanna Baillie and the Theater Theory of British Romantic Women Writers. Philadelphia: University of Philadelphia Press, 1997.
  98. Bustos, Beatriz. Mujeres, Hogar E Industria En El Suroeste de Colombia [Women, Home and Industry in Southeast Columbia]. Guadalajara, Jalisco: Universidad de Guadalajara, Dirección General Académica, 1993.
  99. Butalia, Urvashi, and Ritu Menon. Making a Difference: Feminist Publishing in the South. Oxford: Bellagio Publication Network, 1995.
  100. Butler, Dorothy. All This and a Bookshop Too. Auckland, N.Z.: Penguin Books, 2009.
  101. Butler, Roger. Sydney by Design: Wood and Linoblock Prints by Sydney Women Artists Between the Wars. Canberra: National Gallery of Australia, 1995.
  102. Cadman, Eileen, Gail Chester, and Agnes Pivot. Rolling Our Own: Women As Printers, Publishers and Distributors. London: Minority Press-Group, 1981.
  103. Carlile, Susan, ed. Masters of the Marketplace: British Women Novelists of the 1750. Bethlehem: Lehigh University Pres, 2011.
  104. Cave, Roderick. “The Stockdale Sisters Revisited: Women Printers and Editors in the West Indies [With a Rebuttal by John A. Lent].” Print History (Old Series) 10, no. 2 (1988): 38–45.
  105. Caws, Mary Ann. “The Conception of Engendering: The Erotics of Editing.” In The Poetics of Gender, edited by Nancy K. Miller. New York: Columbia University Press, 1986.
  106. Chang, Leah L. Into Print: The Production of Female Authorship in Early Modern France. Newark: University of Delaware Press, 2009.
  107. Chapman, Alison. “Achieving Fame and Canonicity.” In The Cambridge Companion to Victorian Women’s Writing, edited by Linda H. Peterson, 73–86. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015.
  108. ———. Networking the Nation: British and American Women’s Poetry and Italy, 1840-1870. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015.
  109. ———. , ed. Victorian Women Poets. Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 2003.
  110. Chapman, Mary. Making Noise, Making News: Suffrage Print Culture and U.S. Modernism. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014.
  111. Chesnut, Saralyn, and Amanda C. Gable. “‘Women Ran It’: Charis Books and More and Atlanta’s Lesbian-Feminist Community, 1971-1981.” In Carryin’ on in the Lesbian and Gay South, edited by John Howard, 241–84. New York: New York University Press, 1997.
  112. Chester, Gail. “The Anthology as a Medium for Feminist Debate in the UK.” Women’s Studies International Forum 25, no. 2 (March 2002): 193–207.
  113. Christian-Smith, Linda K. Becoming a Woman Through Romance. New York: Routledge, 1990.
  114. Clarke, Elizabeth, and Lynn Robson. “‘Why Are We “Still Kissing the Rod’?: The Future for the Study of Early Modern Women”s Writing.’” Women’s Writing 14, no. 2 (2007): 177–93.
  115. Club of Printing Women. Antique Modern & Swash: A Brief History of Women in Printing. New York: Club of Printing Women of New York, 1955.
  116. Cohn, Jan. Romance and the Erotics of Poetry: Mass-Market Fiction for Women. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1988.
  117. Coldiron, A.E.B. “Women in Early English Print Culture.” In The History of British Women’s Writing, 1500-1610, edited by Caroline Bicks and Jennifer Summit, 2:60–83. History of British Women’s Writing. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
  118. Coletti, Theresa. “‘Did Women Have a Renaissance?’: A Medievalist Reads Joan Kelly and Aemilia Lanyer.” Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal 8 (2013): 249–59.
  119. Colin, G. La Reliure Féminine et Les Arts Du Cuir En Belgique À La Belle Époque. Buxelles: Librairie Fl. Tulkens, 2004.
  120. Colón, Susan E. The Professional Ideal in the Victorian Novel: The Works of Disraeli, Trollope, Gaskell, and Eliot. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.
  121. Colt, Margaretta Barton. Martial Bliss: The Story of The Military Bookman, 2015.
  122. Conley, John J. “Suppressing Women Philosophers: The Case of the Early Modern Canon.” Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal 1 (2006): 99–114.
  123. Conway, Melissa. The Diario of the Printing Press of San Jacopo Di Ripoli 1476-1484: Commentary and Transcriptions. Firenze: Leo S. Olschki, 1999.
  124. Coogan-Gehr, Kelly. The Geopolitics of the Cold War and Narratives of Inclusion: Excavating a Feminist Archive. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
  125. Cook, Christopher D. “‘Mr Royston I Preye Send These Bookes’: An Oxford Bookseller’s Wife’s Order of 1650.” The Library 15, no. 4 (2014): 432–38.
  126. Cook, Elizabeth. Epistolary Bodies: Gender and Genre in the Eighteenth-Century Republic of Letters. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1996.
  127. Coolahan, Marie-Louise. “Transnational Reception and Early Modern Women’s ‘Lost’ Texts.” Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal 7 (2012): 261–70.
  128. Corbett, Mary Jean. Representing Femininity: Middle-Class Subjectivity and Victorian and Edwardian Women’s Autobiography. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992.
  129. Córdoba Serrano, Alejandra de. Tres Décadas de Mujeres Y Grabado En Granada [Three Decades of Women and Printing/Engraving in Granada]. Granada: Universidad de Granada, Campus Universitario de Cartuja, 2005.
  130. Corse, Sarah M., and Saundra Davis Westervelt. “The Awakening of a Canonical Novel.” Sociological Perspectives 45, no. 2 (Summer 2002): 139–61.
  131. Coultrap-McQuin, Susan. Doing Literary Business: American Women Writers in the Nineteenth Century. Chapel Hill, N.C.: University of North Carolina Press, 1990.
  132. Cowman, Krista. “‘Carrying on a Long Tradition’: Second-Wave Presentations of First-Wave Feminism in Spare Rib C. 1972-80.” European Journal of Women’s Studies 17, no. 3 (2010): 193–210.
  133. Cross, Nigel. “The Female Drudge: Women Novelists and Their Publishers.” In The Common Writer: Life in Nineteenth-Century Grub Street., by Nigel Cross, 164–203. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985.
  134. Cruz, Anne, and Rosilie Hernández. Women’s Literacy in Early Modern Spain and the New World. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2011.
  135. Curtis, Tracy. New Media in Black Women’s Autobiography: Intrepid Embodiment and Narrative. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015.
  136. Cyrus, Cynthia J. Cultural Politics and the English-Canadian Small Press Movement: Three Case Studies. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1997.
  137. ———. Scribes for Women’s Convents in Late Medieval Germany. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2009.
  138. D’Albertis, Deirdre. “The Realist Novel.” In The Cambridge Companion to Victorian Women’s Writing, edited by Linda H. Peterson, 119–32. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015.
  139. Danahy, Michael. The Feminization of the Novel. Gainesville: University of Florida Press, 1991.
  140. Daniell, Beth, and Peter Mortensen, eds. Women and Literacy: Local and Global Inquiries for a New Century. New York; Urbana: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates; National Council of Teachers of English, 2007.
  141. Danky, James P., and Wayne A. Wiegand, eds. Women in Print: Essays on the Print Culture of American Women from the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2006.
  142. David, Deidre. Rule Britannia: Women, Empire, and Victorian Writing. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1995.
  143. Davidson, Peter, and Jane Stevenson. “Elizabeth I’s Reception at Bisham (1592): Elite Women as Writers and Devisers.” In The Progresses, Pageants, and Entertainments of Queen Elizabeth I, edited by Jane Elizabeth Archer, Elizabeth Goldring, and Sarah Knight, 207–26. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007.
  144. Davin, Eric Leif. Women and the Birth of Science Fiction, 1926-1965. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2006.
  145. Davis, Kathy. The Making of Our Bodies, Ourselves: How Feminism Travels Across Borders. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2007.
  146. ———. The Making of Our Bodies, Ourselves: How Feminism Travels Across Borders. Durham: Duke University Press, 2007.
  147. Davis, Natalie Zemon. “Forum: Revisiting Joan Kelly’s ‘Did Women Have a Renaissance?’” Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal 8 (2013): 241–47.
  148. Davis, Tracy C., and Ellen Donkin, eds. Women and Playwriting in Nineteenth-Century Britain. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999.
  149. Day, Sarah K. Reading Like a Girl: Narrative Intimacy in Contemporary American Young Adult Literature. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2013.
  150. De Nicola, Francesco, and Pier Antonio Zannoni, eds. Donne in Libreria : Quanto Leggono E Che Cosa Leggono: Atti Del Convegno Nazionale Di Studi, Rapallo, Sabato 11 Maggio 1996 [Women in the Bookstore: What They Read and How Much They Read: Papers from the National Convention in Rapallo, Saturday 11 May 1996]. Genova: Sage Press, 1997.
  151. dell’Unione donne italiane di Ferrara. Perché La Stampa Femminile? [Why the Women’s Press?]. Ferrara: Libreria editrice I. Bovolenta, 1977.
  152. Demeter, Richard L. Primer, Presses, and Composing Sticks: Women Printers of the Colonial Period. Hicksville, NY: Exposition Press, 1979.
  153. Demoor, Marysa. Their Fair Share: Women, Power and Criticism in the Athenaeum from Millicent Garrett Fawcett to Katherine Mansfield, 1870-1920. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2000.
  154. D’Enbeau, Suzy. “Feminine and Feminist Transformation in Popular Culture.” Feminist Media Studies 9, no. 1 (2009): 17–36.
  155. Diaconoff, Suellen. Through the Reading Glass: Women, Books, and Sex in the French Enlightenment. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2005.
  156. Díaz, Mónica, and Stephanie Kirk. “Women and Kirishitanban Literature: Translation, Gender, andTheology in Early Modern Japan.” Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal 8 (2013): 53–84.
  157. DiCenzo, Maria, Lucy Delap, and Leila Ryan. Feminist Media History: Suffrage, Periodicals and the Public Sphere. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
  158. Dickie, Margaret, and Thomas Travisano, eds. Gendered Modernisms: American Women Poets and Their Readers. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1996.
  159. Dieleman, Karen. Religious Imaginaries: The Liturgical and Poetic Practices of Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Christina Rossetti, and Adelaide Procter. Athens: Ohio University Press, 2012.
  160. Dillane, Finnuala. Before George Eliot: Marian Evans and the Periodical Press. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013.
  161. Dixon, Jay. The Romance Fiction of Mills & Boon, 1909-1990s. London; Philadelphia: UCL Press, 1999.
  162. Dolan, Frances E. Whores of Babylon: Catholicism, Gender, and Seventeenth-Century Print Culture. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1999.
  163. Donawerth, Jane. “Women’s Reading Practices in Seventeenth-Century England: Margaret Fell’s ‘Women’s Speaking Justified’.” The Sixteenth Century Journal 37, no. 4 (Winter 2006): 985–1005.
  164. Donovan, Josephine. Feminist Theory: The Intellectual Traditions. New York: Continuum, 2012.
  165. Dougherty, Joy. “The Construction of Gender Relations and Sexuality in the Printing Labour Process.” PhD Dissertation, Queensland University of Technology, 1995.
  166. Driver, Martha. “Women Printers and the Page: 1477-1541.” Gutenberg-Jahrbuch 73 (1998): 139–53.
  167. Dudovitz, Resa L. The Myth of Superwoman: Women’s Bestsellers in France and the United States. London; New York: Routledge, 1990.
  168. Dzelzainis, Ella. “Silver-Fork, Industrial, and Gothic Fiction.” In The Cambridge Companion to Victorian Women’s Writing, edited by Linda H. Peterson, 105–18. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015.
  169. Eagleton, Mary, ed. Feminist Literary Theory: A Reader. 2nd ed. Malden, Mass.: Wiley-Blackwell, 2011.
  170. Eardley, Alice. “Recreating the Canon: Women Writers and Anthologies of Early Modern Verse.” Women’s Writing 14, no. 2 (2007): 270–89.
  171. Easley, Alexis. First-Person Anonymous: Women Writers and Victorian Print Media, 1830-70. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2004.
  172. ———. Literary Celebrity, Gender, and Victorian Authorship, 1850-1914. Newark: Delaware University Press, 2011.
  173. ———. “Making a Debut.” In The Cambridge Companion to Victorian Women’s Writing, edited by Linda H. Peterson, 29–42. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015.
  174. Eddy, Jacalyn. Bookwomen: Creating an Empire in Children’s Book Publishing, 1919-1939. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2006.
  175. Eichhorn, Kate. The Archival Turn in Feminism. Philadelphia: American Literatures Initiatives, 2013.
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